By Jude Ssebuliba

The world produces enough to feed the entire global population of 7 billion people. And yet, 800 million people of the 7billion people in the world as sleeping hungry, in Uganda 10.4million people are hungry. So why does hunger exist?

There are many reasons for the presence of this cancer and surprisingly, they are often interconnected. Let’s think about a few below;

Poverty trap

People living in poverty can’t afford nutritious food for themselves and their families. This makes them weaker, physically and mentally, so they are less able to earn the money that would help them escape poverty and hunger. Similarly, in developing countries, farmers often can’t afford seeds, so they cannot plant the crops that would provide for their families. They may have to cultivate crops without the tools and fertilizers they need. Others have no land or water or education. In short, the poor are hungry and their hunger traps them in poverty.

Lack of investment in agriculture

Too many developing countries Uganda inclusive lack the roads, warehouses and irrigation systems that would help them overcome hunger. Without this key infrastructure, communities are left facing high transport costs, a lack of storage facilities and unreliable water supplies — all of which conspire to limit farmers’ yields and families’ access to food.

Climate and weather

Natural disasters such as floods, tropical storms and long periods of drought are on the increase — with calamitous consequences for the hungry poor in developing countries. Drought is already one of the most common causes of food shortages in the world.

In many countries, climate change is exacerbating already tough conditions. The world’s fertile farmland is under threat from erosion, salination and desertification. Meanwhile, deforestation by human hands accelerates the erosion of land which could be used for growing food.

Unstable markets

In recent years, the price of food products has been very unstable. Roller-coaster food prices make it difficult for the poorest people to get nutritious food consistently – which is exactly what they need to do. Families need access to adequate food all year round. Price spikes, on the other hand, may temporarily put food out of reach, which can have lasting consequences for small children.

When prices rise, consumers often shift to cheaper, less-nutritious foods, heightening the risks of micronutrient deficiencies and other forms of malnutrition

Food wastage

One third of all food produced (1.3 billion tons) is never consumed. This food wastage represents a missed opportunity to improve global food security in a world where one in 8 is hungry.

Producing this food also uses up precious natural resources that we need to feed the planet. Producing this food also adds 3.3 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, with consequences for the climate and, ultimately, for food production.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *